Sara Francis on creativity?

The Watchmen comic is heavy, sophisticated in the way it tackles the subject that I burn with a jealous rage over how good it is. Silly as it is, in my head I’m going “This comic writer is a better writer than me! I might as well give up now.” I know I shouldn’t, and when it comes down to it, it’s just my social conditioning still telling me that comic books are not a respected form of storytelling.  The idea that a comic can win critical acclaim and inspire literary articles is still a new concept for me, just like having an essay as a multi-media essay like this: http://www.washingtonpost.com/posttv/afterthestorm/index.html#/dear-future-disaster-survivor The week has really been an encompassing of my experience as a English major: Art is everywhere and every medium is worth looking for gems in.

This book What it is that we’ve been going through have been has been way more self-reflecting than I ever expected Graphic novels class would be. I’ve been reading this and just lying in my bed thinking about questions like “Do we need monsters?” It jumps back and forth between being completely personal and vague enough in an existential way that makes it very relatable. I don’t think this book is about being creative as much as it’s trying to get you to look inward for your own unique inspiration. An idea that I find rare, having read writing hand books for many years. Most of them are telling you to looking outside, observe the world around you and write down what you think is interesting in a flowing way. In this text, you are what makes the world inspiring, not the other way around.

The memories that these exercises are dredging up has been leading us all along into trips into our childhood. I’m learning new things about my Roberts childhood! We’ve been together for two years, I thought I’d heard the important parts. At one point we were recounting memories and my best friend, Amelia, is recounting hers and I’m convinced she’s talking about something that happened to us, but getting the details wrong, but then she turns to me and says “This isn’t your mom.” I’ve been around for most of Amelia’s life, so hear a story that I didn’t know about was a little jarring. I didn’t volunteer my stories because I was afraid of offending her, but once we got back to our room, we shared a laugh about her mom’s god awful ‘wholegrain pancakes.’

The planning of the webcomic has been taking up a lot more time. Organizing five people has been the least of our worries. With the five of us we’ve been able to come up with too many ideas to pick from, and we have to get our focus in check. High school magic is going to be great.  The creativity being passed around is kind of inspiring. We’ve been planning out the first comic for two weeks now, but now that the project is on the horizon, it’s clear that we can’t waste time like that.