The Power of the Pose

Back in 2012 when commercials and advertising for The Avengers began to saturate media everywhere, one poster in particular caught people’s attention. It peaked one artist interest so much that they choose to draw a parody image to emphasis how ridiculous the posing of women truly is by applying it to men in the movie poster.

(c) kevinbolk 2015
(c) kevinbolk 2015

In Conor’s article about how women are portrayed in comic books, they mention that comic books are not the only ones at fault when it comes to sexualizing women and I couldn’t agree more. The image pictured above was a specific example I was made aware of through tumblr, but after seeing this poster I searched around on google to see if a trend really did exist. I am sad to say, it was much worse than I ever imagined.

(c) Marvel Enterprises 2003
(c) Marvel Enterprises 2003
(c) Summit Entertainment 2014
(c) Summit Entertainment 2014

In old movies as well as new, female characters always seem to take the more suggestive or sexualized role when it comes to their pose in advertisements. And it may seem like such a simple thing and the thought that it could have such an impact on how women are viewed in our society and how they view themselves could be hard to swallow. Having these skinny and curvy women placed on advertisements such as the ones pictured above and put in such sexualized poses does indeed influence how women see the standards of beauty and how they will never measure up.

 

I do not think I could word it better than dahlia when they discuss female super heroes and how they are drawn in comics when she states, “Don’t be in awe of her round tuchus and ample bosom or bare skin, be in awe of her fierce demeanor and charm. Fall in love with her because she’s got a winning smile.”

 

But on a happier note, I would like to say that we may be making bigger strides in the race against sexism in media than was originally believed or that is what this poster from The Hobbit franchise would otherwise suggest. Legolas seems to have taken on the typically feminine pose while Tauriel takes on the typically masculine one.

(c) New Line Cinema 2013
(c) New Line Cinema 2013

I guess in conclusion, while this topic has come up in other articles in the past, I wanted to further emphasis that while we have come a long way as a society in how women are view, “the culture at large continues to place a great emphasis on how women look.” And I think something as simple as a movie poster can really shine some light on the current status of the situation.

  1 comment for “The Power of the Pose

  1. alainazitzmann
    October 17, 2015 at 7:37 am

    I really like your examples, especially throwing in the Divergent poster since that movie is supposed to focus on a strong female lead. I also think one of the major problems in movies that portray women as ‘perfect warriors’ really presents a problem. While these women are shown to be fierce and capable, they are still out shown by their male counterparts. Even is a movie about Tris, the Divergent poster puts the male lead in front of her. There are so many ways to critique posters and promotional pieces, and I think you did a good job looking at the pose portion of it.

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